Dance Of The Week – Flight Of The Earls

The Dance Of The Week for this week is Flight Of The Earls, or The Leuven Set by Jim Keenan that chronicles the flight of the Earls from Donegal beginning in 1607.

It’s not a particularly difficult dance but does have a variety of movements in each figure that will keep you thinking.

Click through for notes and video links.

Dance Of The Week – Battle Of Affane

The Dance Of The Week for this week is a new set, The Battle of Affane, demonstrated at the Sweets of May Dance Festival in Tralee in 2015.  It’s a short set commemorating the 1565 Battle of Affane and has a good variety of movements including doubling!

Click through for notes.  If anyone has some video of this set, please share!

Dance Of The Week – An Rince Mor

The Dance Of The Week for this week is a very easy Irish ceili dance An Rince Mor or The Big Dance.  It’s a round dance for four couples though in a ceili setting you can easily make the circle as big as you like.  You just need an even number of dancers.

Click through for notes and video links.

Dance Of The Week – Cross Of The Commons

The Dance Of the Week for this week is the Cross Of The Commons set, an Irish set dance recently composed by Joan Pollard Carew in memory of her father Jackie Pollard.

The dance is short (only 3 figures) and easy to learn and has a few unusual moves to keep you interested.

Click through for notes and figure videos.

Dance Of The Week – Trip To The Cottage

For this week we’ve got an Ar Rinci Foirne ceili dance that will take some practice to get right but when done all the way through will give you a decent workout.  Trip To The Cottage is danced with 4 couples in a square formation and has four major movements to keep you thinking.  Remember, get those feet up!

Click through for notes and video links.

Dance Of The Week – Foraer A Neaintin

The dance for this week is an easy, but fun Irish set dance that’s also known as the Connemara Jig set.  Foraer A Neaintin was originally danced as a half-set and you’ll often find that the first three figures are shortened to omit the second tops and sides repeats. Some people just want to get to the next dance I suppose.  Click through for notes and links to video and music references.